A Story-Writing Challenge

Writer's Ramble

cover.dunmore

My elderly aunt Peggy emailed me recently with a playful suggestion that we write each other a story.  My aunt could always be counted on to initiate fun and adventuresome activities for us kids as we were growing up, and this idea was typical of her fun-loving spirit.  She posed that we write our stories within a framework, that we pretend to be rookie reporters for some small-town newspaper who stumble upon clues to a scandal in the works.  I accepted her challenge and agreed to her terms, and she gave us a deadline of approximately two months to finish our tales of mystery and suspense.

During the two months, we each found the task to be more rigorous than we had thought it would be.  I soon found myself consumed with the project as my story began to develop and my characters to flesh themselves out, and pretty soon…

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Drawing Down The Moon

enchanter's

My friend, Thomas, is working on The Enchanter’s Almanac for 2018, to be released later this month.  Last year’s edition was the first and received some positive reviews from readers. We believe the coming year’s almanac will be even better.

Copied below is an article from the soon-coming edition, which will be available for purchase on Amazon.

Here is an article on the topic of moon magic:

Drawing Down the Moon

     No witch worth her salt ignores the potent resource of the moon to enhance the power of her spell casting.  From the most ancient times in history, magic practitioners have felt the strong allure of the moon and have comprehended the effect and supremacy of its cycles on the ocean tides and the climate, on menstrual cycles, on the mood and behavior of animals and people, and on the effectiveness of magic ceremonies and incantations. Witches in ancient literary traditions, while performing midnight rituals, were described as “drawing down the moon” to work their mysterious craft.  Those  well-versed in moon lore for the purpose of magical influence understand how lunar phases work to impact particular outcomes commensurate with either waxing or waning movements; that is, whether the goal is to attract or repel, to invite or banish, to enhance or diminish. 

     Each phase of the moon lends power to specific magical objectives; for example, a witch performing a spell to evict a troublesome spirit or banish a disease might draw on the energies of the dark or new moon, a spell to attract money or success is best executed during the moon’s first quarter phase, and an invocation to end a relationship or an irksome business partnership and promote closure is most effectively implemented during the waning gibbous cycle.    The time of the full moon is most popular among practitioners because the moon, during this phase, is at its height of its vigor and brightness and dynamism.  Magic intended to tackle your most difficult challenges, when a surge of enhanced energy is required, should be performed during the full moon.   The power of this lunar phase is best reserved for those times and situations that call for the heavy lifting of magic, for those big things needing significantly more “oomph” to either hurl them away or pull them near, or to shrink them down or enlarge them in your life.

     Perhaps the most charming effect of the moon, particularly when at its fullest, is the ideal atmosphere it creates for spell crafting, not to mention the practice of meditation, astral travel, coven ritual and feast day celebrations.  At no other time does a witch feel more like herself and in her element than while reveling in her craft under the gaze of a large, shimmery moon, dancing in ecstasy and ceremony, singing and chanting her spells, or simply rejoicing in nature.

    

 

 

 

 

A Story-Writing Challenge

cover.dunmore

My elderly aunt Peggy emailed me recently with a playful suggestion that we write each other a story.  My aunt could always be counted on to initiate fun and adventuresome activities for us kids as we were growing up, and this idea was typical of her fun-loving spirit.  She posed that we write our stories within a framework, that we pretend to be rookie reporters for some small-town newspaper who stumble upon clues to a scandal in the works.  I accepted her challenge and agreed to her terms, and she gave us a deadline of approximately two months to finish our tales of mystery and suspense.

During the two months, we each found the task to be more rigorous than we had thought it would be.  I soon found myself consumed with the project as my story began to develop and my characters to flesh themselves out, and pretty soon I was losing sleep at night, rising up at all hours to jot down plot ideas and snippets of dialogue running through my head.  Aunt Peggy wrote to me, rather discouraged, describing her difficulty with the process and expressing some doubt about whether she could complete the challenge.  I told her I was also having trouble and that it was fine if she wanted to take a break from it and let the story percolate for awhile.

I finally finished my story and entitled it “The Haunting Of Dunmore Gap.”  I sent it to my aunt, who seemed to like it.  I began to get an idea about publishing an account of this story-writing challenge along with the stories themselves as an Amazon Kindle Book.  I waited awhile to receive my aunt’s story, but so far it hasn’t come, though I think she is still working on it in her way and in her time.

Meanwhile, I decided to go ahead to go ahead and publish my story, with an intro describing how the story came to be written, inspired by my aunt’s challenge.  When her story is done, I won’t hesitate to add it to this slim volume.

And here it is: